Category Archives: Science

Considering the Moon


What is it about the Moon that captures the fancy of humankind? A silvery disk hanging in the night sky, it conjures up images of romance and magic. It has been counted upon to foreshadow important events, both of good … Continue reading

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Three Zones of the Solar System


With the success of the New Horizon’s spacecraft visiting Pluto and the Kuiper Belt, it seemed appropriate to discuss hte major zones of the solar system. The solar system consists of the Sun and the objects bound to it through … Continue reading

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Wednesday’s Book Review: “Breaking the Time Barrier”


Breaking the Time Barrier: The Race to Build the First Time Machine. By Jenny Randles. New York: Paraview Pocket Books, 2005. I adore books like this, stretching one’s concepts beyond their comfort zone to consider new possibilities. At the same … Continue reading

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Wedesday’s Book Review: “Infinite in All Directions”


Infinite in All Directions: Gifford Lectures Given at Aberdeen, Scotland, April-November 1985. By Freeman J. Dyson. New York: Harper and Row, 1988. Although this book has been available for more than 25 years, I recently reread it and found it … Continue reading

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Wednesday’s Book Review: “Antarctic Destinies”


Antarctic Destinies: Scott, Shackleton, and the Changing Face of Heroism. By Stephanie Barczewski. London, UK: Hambledon Continuum, 2007. I have been interested in Antarctic exploration for many years and have read a broad range of books. Antarctic Destinies is focused … Continue reading

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Remembering a Great Adventure: The First Circumlunar Mission


After a piloted orbital mission to test the Apollo equipment in October 1968, on December 21, 1968, Apollo 8 took off atop a Saturn V booster from the Kennedy Space Center with three astronauts aboard—Frank Borman, James A. Lovell Jr., … Continue reading

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Great Picture of the Earth from Saturn


This is very cool. This is a rare image taken on July 19, 2013, the wide-angle camera on NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has captured Saturn’s rings and our planet Earth and a faint hint of the Moon. Note the arrow pointing … Continue reading

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Wednesday’s Book Review: “Picturing the Cosmos”


Picturing the Cosmos: Hubble Space Telescope Images and the Astronomical Sublime. By Elizabeth A. Kessler. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012. Abbreviations, acknowledgments, notes, illustrations, bibliography, index. ISBN: 978-0-8166-7957-7. Paperback, $29.95 USD. There is no astronomical instrument better known worldwide … Continue reading

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Announcing the Space Policy and History Forum #18


The next Space Policy and History Forum takes place on December 1, 2015, and will feature Michael Meyer, the Mars Exploration Program Scientist at NASA Headquarters, presenting “Astrobiology in Action.” Please note that this forum will be held at the Applied Physics Laboratory, not … Continue reading

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Redirect: The Narcissistic Narcotic of the “Tech Intellectuals”


This is a brilliant blog post by W. Patrick McCray. You do not want to miss “The Narcissistic Narcotic of the ‘Tech Intellectuals’.” It deals with what many people are calling technology intellectuals. With Twitter, Facebook, and blogs like this one the … Continue reading

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